PharmaLedger Association Launches Digital Trust Ecosystem in Healthcare

photo PharmaLedger video release link

original image of PharmaLedger event and link to video release

BASEL, Switzerland, March 13, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The PharmaLedger Association™ (PLA), a not-for-profit based in Switzerland, announces the endorsement of its 3-year strategic plan to implement and promote a Digital Trust Ecosystem in healthcare (DTE-H) at its Annual General Meeting held in Lucerne, Switzerland on 1 March 2023. The member organizations also confirmed the appointment of eight Directors to its board, delivering on PLA’s core value of “Ecosystem Leadership.”

Representing the diversity of healthcare, PLA’s founding members comprise of large and small pharmaceutical companies, research organizations, patient representative organizations, non-profit organizations, technology, and healthcare service providers. PLA has confirmed its mandate as a pre-competition umbrella organization delivering common and interoperable digital solutions in the areas of Product TrustDecentralized Clinical Trials, and Supply Chain Traceability.

  • Products & Project: In Q1 2023, PLA will release the first qualified product, electronic Product Information for implementation by its members.
    In Q2 2023, the Association will continue with the development of new products in its innovation xLab, including of a product digital twin, decentralized identities, and verifiable credentials to facilitate visibility, security, traceability, and trust in all areas of healthcare.
  • Governance & Compliance: PLA will leverage its capability to develop, qualify, launch, and maintain products in healthcare’s highly regulated environment by ensuring continuous adherence to antitrust, intellectual property, data privacy, and Computerized System Assurance guidelines.
  • Ecosystem Engagement & Growth: The association will continue to onboard new members and engage with authorities, trade associations and standards development organizations, ensuring growth and financial viability.
  • Platform Technology & Security: PLA will focus on easing adoption of new solutions with its members and users while maintaining the cybersecurity benefits of its architecture.

The formation of PLA and the endorsement of its mission by diverse members of healthcare is a major milestone. This paves the way for delivery of widely trusted blockchain-based platforms with new open-source healthcare solutions to create value for patients and ecosystem stakeholders. PLA is grateful to its 20 founding members and invites all healthcare related organizations to learn more and engage towards the realization of a trusted Healthcare 4.0.

“Blockchain is a team sport. PLA has started with a diverse and strong team of members with a common vision and who believe in real change. With PLA we have the right vehicle, resources, and roadmap to take patients to a better place in healthcare,” Daniel Fritz, Executive Director, PharmaLedger Association.

PRESS RELEASE PHARMALEDGER video release

PLA is the result of the successful completion of the PharmaLedger research project, a €22 million, 30-member consortium with 12 large pharma companies and 18 public partners, funded under the European Union (EU) and European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA)’s Innovative Health Initiative.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/0682572a-b8ac-4b5b-885b-8af008287cff

Contact – [email protected] / www.pharmaledger.org

GlobeNewswire Distribution ID 1000797758

Surge in Arms Imports to Europe, While U.S. Dominance of the Global Arms Trade Increases

Imports of major arms by European states increased by 47 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22, while the global level of international arms transfers decreased by 5.1 percent. The United States’ share of global arms exports increased from 33 to 40 percent while Russia’s fell from 22 to 16 percent.

Imports of major arms by European states increased by 47 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22, while the global level of international arms transfers decreased by 5.1 percent.Arms imports fell overall in Africa (–40 percent), the Americas (–21 percent), Asia and Oceania (–7.5 percent) and the Middle East (–8.8 percent)—but imports to East Asia and certain states in other areas of high geopolitical tension rose sharply. The United States’ share of global arms exports increased from 33 to 40 percent while Russia’s fell from 22 to 16 percent, according to new data on global arms transfers published by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

‘Even as arms transfers have declined globally, those to Europe have risen sharply due to the tensions between Russia and most other European states,’ said Pieter D. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Program. ‘Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, European states want to import more arms, faster. Strategic competition also continues elsewhere: arms imports to East Asia have increased and those to the Middle East remain at a high level.’

U.S. and French Arms Exports Increase as Russian Exports Decline

Global arms exports have long been dominated by the U.S. and Russia (consistently the largest and second largest arms exporters for the past three decades). However, the gap between the two has been widening significantly, while that between Russia and the third largest supplier, France, has narrowed. US arms exports increased by 14 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22, and the USA accounted for 40 percent of global arms exports in 2018–22. Russia’s arms exports fell by 31 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22, and its share of global arms exports decreased from 22 percent to 16 percent, while France’s share increased from 7.1 percent to 11 percent.

Russian arms exports decreased to 8 of its 10 biggest recipients between 2013–17 and 2018–22. Exports to India, the largest recipient of Russian arms, fell by 37 percent, while exports to the other 7 decreased by an average of 59 percent. However, Russian arms exports increased to China (+39 percent) and Egypt (+44 percent), and they became Russia’s second and third largest recipients.

‘It is likely that the invasion of Ukraine will further limit Russia’s arms exports. This is because Russia will prioritize supplying its armed forces and demand from other states will remain low due to trade sanctions on Russia and increasing pressure from the USA and its allies not to buy Russian arms,’ said Siemon T. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Program.

France’s arms exports increased by 44 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22. Most of these exports were to states in Asia and Oceania and the Middle East. India received 30 percent of France’s arms exports in 2018–22, and France displaced the USA as the second largest supplier of arms to India after Russia.

‘France is gaining a bigger share of the global arms market as Russian arms exports decline, as seen in India, for example,’ said Pieter D. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Program. ‘This seems likely to continue, as by the end of 2022, France had far more outstanding orders for arms exports than Russia.’

Ukraine Becomes World’s Third Largest Arms Importer in 2022

From 1991 until the end of 2021, Ukraine imported few major arms. As a result of military aid from the USA and many European states following the Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, Ukraine became the 3rd biggest importer of major arms during 2022 (after Qatar and India) and the 14th biggest for 2018–22. Ukraine accounted for 2.0 percent of global arms imports in the five-year period.

‘Due to concerns about how the supply of combat aircraft and long-range missiles could further escalate the war in Ukraine, NATO states declined Ukraine’s requests for them in 2022. At the same time, they supplied such arms to other states involved in conflict, particularly in the Middle East and South Asia,’ said Pieter D. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Program.

Asia and Oceania Still the Top Importing Region

Asia and Oceania received 41 percent of major arms transfers in 2018–22, a slightly smaller share than in 2013–17. Despite the overall decline in transfers to the region, there were marked increases in some states, and marked decreases in others. Six states in the region were among the 10 largest importers globally in 2018–22: India, Australia, China, South Korea, Pakistan and Japan.

Arms imports by East Asian states increased by 21 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22. Arms imports by China rose by 4.1 percent, with most coming from Russia. However, the biggest increases in East Asia were by U.S. treaty allies South Korea (+61 percent) and Japan (+171 percent). Australia, the largest arms importer in Oceania, increased its imports by 23 percent.

‘Growing perceptions of threats from China and North Korea have driven rising demand for arms imports by Japan, South Korea and Australia, notably including for long-range strike weapons,’ said Siemon T. Wezeman, Senior Researcher with the SIPRI Arms Transfers Program. ‘The main supplier for all three is the USA.’

India remains the world’s top arms importer, but its arms imports declined by 11 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22. This decline was linked to a complex procurement process, efforts to diversify arms suppliers and attempts to replace imports with local designs. Imports by Pakistan, the world’s eighth largest arms importer in 2018–22, increased by 14 percent, with China as its main supplier.

Middle East Receives High-End U.S. and European Arms

Three of the top 10 importers in 2018–22 were in the Middle East: Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Egypt. Saudi Arabia was the world’s second largest arms importer in 2018–22 and received 9.6 percent of all arms imports in the period. Qatar’s arms imports increased by 311 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22, making it the world’s third biggest arms importer in 2018–22.

The great majority of arms imports to the Middle East came from the USA (54 percent), followed by France (12 percent), Russia (8.6 percent) and Italy (8.4 percent). They included more than 260 advanced combat aircraft, 516 new tanks and 13 frigates. Arab states in the Gulf region alone have placed orders for another more than 180 combat aircraft, while 24 have been ordered from Russia by Iran (which received virtually no major arms during 2018–22).

Other Notable Developments

• Arms imports to South East Asia decreased by 42 percent between 2013–17 and 2018–22. This decrease was at least partly because states are still absorbing equipment delivered before 2018. The Philippines bucked this trend, with an increase in arms imports of 64 percent.

• European NATO states increased their arms imports by 65 percent as they sought to strengthen their arsenals in response to a perceived heightened threat from Russia.

• The USA’s arms exports to Türkiye decreased dramatically between 2013–17 and 2018–22 due to bilateral tensions. Türkiye fell from 7th to 27th largest recipient of US arms.

• Arms imports by states in sub-Saharan Africa fell by 23 percent, with Angola, Nigeria and Mali the biggest recipients. Russia overtook China as the largest arms supplier to the subregion.

• Arms imports by three states in the Americas rose significantly: the USA (+31 percent), Brazil (+48 percent) and Chile (+56 percent).

• Among the top seven arms exporters after the USA, Russia and France, five countries saw falling arms exports—China (–23 percent), Germany (–35 percent), the United Kingdom (–35 percent), Spain (–4.4 percent) and Israel (–15 percent)—while two saw large increases—Italy (+45 percent) and South Korea (+74 percent).

Source: EMM

Ukraine is third-largest global arms importer – study

The US and EU’s extensive military aid to Kiev amid its ongoing conflict with Moscow made Ukraine the third largest importer of major arms in 2022, after Qatar and India, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) reported on Monday.

Ukraine also ranked as the 14th largest weapons importer in the world for the five-year period between 2018 and 2022, accounting for some 2% of global arms imports, the think tank found.

While the global level of international arms transfers has fallen by 5.1% in the past five years, SIPRI also reported that imports of arms by European states saw a sharp increase of 47%, while European NATO states increased their weapon imports by 65% amid a perceived threat from Russia.

“Even as arms transfers have declined globally, those to Europe have risen sharply due to tensions between Russia and most other European states,” noted Pieter D. Wezeman, a senior SIPRI researcher, adding that European states now want to “import more arms, faster.”

He also observed that, while the US and other NATO states have declined Kiev’s requests for combat aircraft and long-range missiles out of fears of an escalation in the Russian-Ukrainian conflict, they have nevertheless supplied such arms to other states involved in the conflict, “particularly in the Middle East and South Asia.”

Russia and the US have remained the biggest weapons exporters in the world, although Moscow’s share of arms sales reportedly fell from 22% to 16% while Washington’s share saw an increase from 33% to 40%. Also, between 2018 and 2022, US arms sales grew by 14%, while Russia’s sales fell by 31%.

Meanwhile, Asia and Oceania accounted for 41% of arms deliveries in 2018-2022, with countries like India, Australia, China, South Korea, Pakistan and Japan landing in the top ten of global arms importers. Wesman explained that the increased demand is being driven by a perceived growing threat from China and North Korea.

As for the Middle East, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Egypt found themselves in the top ten of weapons importers for the past five years, with the great majority of weapons being provided by the USA (54%), followed by France, Russia and Italy. The sales included over 260 advanced combat aircraft, over 500 new tanks and 13 frigates, SIPRI reported.

Source: Russia Today

107 ships transit Suez Canal, highest daily record in canal’s history

Chairman of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA) Osama Rabie said that 107 ships crossed the waterway in the two directions Monday, carrying a total cargo of 6.3 million tons, representing the highest daily record in the history of the international waterway.

In a statement today, Rabie added that the south-bound convoy included 56 vessels carrying 3.4 million tons, while the north-bound one included 51 ships with a cargo weighing 2.9 million tons.

Source: State Information Service Egypt

Egypt transformed into world’s important center for outsourcing services

The Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC) said that Egypt has 35 international centers for outsourcing services which provide 34,000 job opportunities with a plan of doubling their businesses in Egypt over the coming two or three years.

This came in an Infograph released by IDSC on Monday. The graph highlighted Egypt’s signing of agreements with 29 international companies to provide outsourcing services to them in November 2022.

“In recent years, Egypt has transformed into one of the world’s most important centres in outreach services; It has come to host many of the largest companies in the industry, with which it serves customers around the world. This comes in the light of the State’s efforts to facilitate the operation of these companies, notably the advanced Internet infrastructure.” the Infograph said.

It added that outsourcing in Egypt is characterized with skilled manpower as around 600,000 graduates are added to labor market every year along with the training of 200,000 individuals by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology with total investments of EGP 1.1 billion, according to the infograph.

It also highlighted Egypt’s development of its technology infrastructure which is also a key factor of attracting foreign companies, adding that Egypt spent more than dlrs 1 billion in the upgrade of internet infrastructure over the past few years.

Source: State Information Service Egypt

IDSC: Egypt transformed into world’s most important center for outsourcing services

The Cabinet Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC) said that Egypt has 35 international centers for outsourcing services which provide 34,000 job opportunities with a plan of doubling their businesses in Egypt over the coming two or three years.

This came in an Infograph released by IDSC on Monday. The graph highlighted Egypt’s signing of agreements with 29 international companies to provide outsourcing services to them in November 2022.

“In recent years, Egypt has transformed into one of the world’s most important centres in outreach services; It has come to host many of the largest companies in the industry, with which it serves customers around the world. This comes in the light of the State’s efforts to facilitate the operation of these companies, notably the advanced Internet infrastructure.” the Infograph said.

It added that outsourcing in Egypt is characterized with skilled manpower as around 600,000 graduates are added to labor market every year along with the training of 200,000 individuals by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology with total investments of EGP 1.1 billion, according to the infograph.

It also highlighted Egypt’s development of its technology infrastructure which is also a key factor of attracting foreign companies, adding that Egypt spent more than dlrs 1 billion in the upgrade of internet infrastructure over the past few years.

Source: State Information Service Egypt

Mufti: We are keen on supporting New Republic

Egypt’s Mufti Shawki Allam asserted that Iftaa House has this year outlined a strategy for action to optimize the technology means to deliver its message and respond to the largest number of questions from people concerning the holy month of Ramadan.

Interviewed by MENA, Allam said the Iftaa House has increased the number of electronic fatwas (a legal ruling on a point of Islamic law (sharia) given by a qualified Faqih (Islamic jurist) in response to a question) received through the Iftaa House website, adding that electronic applications via smart phones are also available to respond to questions in a bid to remove any impediments facing people regarding the religious affairs related to fasting or others.

He also noted that live working hours via the Iftaa house social media page will be increased as well, in addition to releasing statements and daily press releases on the fasting rules and other relevant conditions.

Asked on monopoly of commodities during Ramadan month, Allam asserted that such practices are prohibited by Islamic sharia, noting that traders should work on serving people to gain Allah’s mercy and reward.

He said the world is now suffering an economic recession, pressing the need for garnering up efforts of the rich people to help the poor and those in need in such circumstances.

People should seize the opportunity of Ramadan month to do much charity work and good actions to come closer to God by all means along with maintaining their performance at work as fasting does not mean that people stop working, but work should be done with dedication and all honesty as Prophet Muhammed told us, he added.

On the role of Iftaa House in the New Republic, Allam said there is no doubt that the New Republic would play an important role in changing the conditions on the ground, adding that Iftaa House was keen on supporting the State’s efforts by renewing the religious discourse and uncover the claims of terrorist groups and fight extremism with the objective of maintaining stability in the society and increase people’s awareness.

Source: State Information Service Egypt

Egypt launches “Horus-2” satellite for remote sensing

The CEO of the Egyptian Space Agency (EgSA), Sherif Sedky, said Monday that a “Horus-2” satellite will help meet requirements of Egypt’s 2030 vision for sustainable development.

Egypt has successfully launched the “Horus- 2” satellite from the launch base in northwest China, Sedky said in statements to Channel One, adding it carried high-resolution imaging cameras on board.

Sedky said that the satellite was launched as part of strategic cooperation between Egypt and China.

“Horus-2” is among a group of remote sensing satellites, and it is being developed through the full participation of a team of Egyptian and Chinese experts, he noted.

Such satellites are designed to recognize the surrounding environment with the aim to maximize the use of natural resources, thus achieving the sustainable development goals of 2030, Sedky made it clear.

Source: State Information Service Egypt